Best Induction Ranges of 2018

By James Aitchison, Lindsay D. Mattison, and Kori Perten

If you fancy yourself a home chef, you owe it to yourself to consider the benefits of an induction range. Though they cost a little more than comparable gas or electric ranges, these cutting-edge machines offer faster boiling times, pinpoint temperature control, and incredible efficiency.

Induction has been very, very slow to catch on the U.S., much to the chagrin of appliance makers. Since it's the newest technology for full-size ovens, induction cooking is awash in questions, fears, and misinformation. That's a real shame, because induction is awesome—something professional chefs have known for years. We've written about the topic a lot, but our Induction 101 guide is a great place to get started with basic questions.

If you're past the basics and just want to buy, we recommend the Kenmore 95103 (available at Sears for $1,299.99) as our top choice. It's also the most affordable of the batch we tested.

— Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.

Updated March 16, 2018

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Kenmore 95103 oven Best Overall
Credit: Kenmore

Kenmore 95103

Kenmore 95103
  • Editors' Choice

Kenmore 95103

Best Overall

The Kenmore 95103 freestanding range sports a near-perfect rangetop in terms of temperature range and one of the fastest preheat speeds we have ever seen on our lab tests. The baking performance wasn't the best we've ever seen, but its evenness was above average. Combine all that with a convenient self-clean cycle and you're left with a range that's easy for us to recommend. Read full review.

Kenmore Elite 95073

Kenmore 95073
  • Editors' Choice

Kenmore Elite 95073

This Kenmore is an above-average range designed with induction newbies in mind. There are a few quirks that will need getting used to, but the numerous benefits of induction far outweigh the downsides. We’ll be straight with you: There are plenty of cheaper ranges and better ovens to be had out there. But that being said, if you’re keen to try induction, it's tough to find a better option at this price point. Read full review.

Frigidaire FGIF3036TF

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  • Best of Year 2017

Frigidaire FGIF3036TF

Induction is a great technology, but has always had a problem: It’s expensive. That’s why we love Frigidaire’s new FGIF3036TF. On sale for just under $900, it’s the least expensive induction range we’ve ever seen with an oven that also offers convection baking.

If you’ve always been interested in induction, but have been scared off by high prices, we think this Frigidaire would make a great introduction.

LG LSE4617ST

048232335415

LG LSE4617ST

If you’re looking for a technology-forward induction range, LG doesn’t disappoint. With their app, you can check the oven timer, preheat the oven, and even turn it off without having to get up off the couch.

While it did boast excellent burner performance – boiling water as quickly as some of the best induction ranges we tested – the oven struggled to match up. Despite its ProBake Convection technology, the oven underperformed in both baking and roasting tests. Couple that with a high price tag and a touchpad that you have to push so hard it actually hurt our fingers, we’re going to give this one a pass.

How We Tested

How we test cooktops
Credit: Reviewed
A metal disk attached to a temperature gauge measures the temperature of a burner.

The gas ranges in this roundup were tested over a period of years, all adhering to the same careful procedures in a lab environment. We consider set-up and ease of use, cooking performance, and fit, finish & feel.

The cooking tests are, as you might expect, the most involved and the most heavily weighted part of the process. We use cake, cookies, toast, and pork roast as the food samples—always from the same source and prepared in exactly the same way. If an oven has a convection fan, we usually test with convection on and off. If it's a double oven, we usually test both upper and lower.

Read the super-detailed version of how we test ovens here.

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