ovens

KitchenAid KGRS505XSS Review

We expected great things from this range, but it lacks the chops we'd like to see in a cooker this costly.

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Introduction

For around $2000 (MSRP $2150), we expected great things from this range. Unfortunately, the has all the features and trimmings, but it lacks the real chops we'd like to see in a cooker this costly.

There are some pros: The quick preheat times are impressive, and we don't have too much criticism for the conventional oven temperature variance. But we did see weaknesses almost everywhere else: the underpowered rangetop, the lousy convection oven, the convoluted control panel, and the chilly oven. Since many other ranges that we've tested have cost less and performed better, we can't recommend this KitchenAid.

Design & Usability

Packed with features, this gas range at least brings a professional look to the kitchen.

The KitchenAid KGRS505XSS is a 30-inch gas range with four standard burners, one center oval burner that can handle a griddle, and two self-cleaning ovens. Though it's built on a consumer platform, the KitchenAid KGRS505XSS has the look and feel of a more professionally oriented device. Big, heavy grates look like someone stole them from the 10-burner Garland at the local steakhouse, and stainless trim covers nearly everything that cabinets won't. Inside, the enamel is as blue as a well-known performance art troupe's makeup. It's an upscale look for Whirlpool's higher-end brand.

The oven also has a slow cook function. Tweet It

The KitchenAid KGRS505XSS's most obvious feature is the set of dual ovens that total 6.0 cubic feet. The 2.1 cubic foot upper oven also doubles as the broiler, and impressed us with its preheat times. The lower 3.9 cubic foot oven has a convection fan with a heated element, but it let us down with a lack of consistent temperatures. The lower oven's top rack has rollers—the sort of luxury convenience we enjoy using. The oven also has a slow cook function, which keeps food just above the keep-warm temperature, providing an alternative to a countertop slow cooker. From the zillion buttons on the control panel, users can also select a variety of convection cooking options. Users may select from options such as convection roast, convection bake, and bread proofing, or even input a particular type of food.

Rangetop

A pedestrian rangetop from this expensive range

Though it's part of a stove that costs almost two grand, the rangetop seems like it was stolen off a $700 gas range. One burner's boiling performance tested well, but there wasn't a second burner that could even come close to that result. This is a gas range, so you do get superior control, but you also get a narrow temperature range with poor searing and simmering results.

Oven Broiler & Convection

Don't be thrilled just because an appliance features multiple ovens.

The convection oven displayed some shockingly poor temperature control. Tweet It

The upper oven heated up to 350°F in just seven and a half minutes—finally, a spectacular result—but little else proved impressive. For most of the cooking temperatures, the oven missed its mark. People who bake delicate food ought to invest in a thermometer to go with this oven. Below, the convection oven may have hit the 350°F mark on the nose, but it displayed some shockingly poor temperature control, the kind that can easily burn a dish on the outside while leaving it raw on the inside. On the bright side, the broiler did well, taking just under nine minutes to reach 600°F.

Conclusion

This probably isn't a great deal.

For a $1959 hunk of stainless steel (MSRP $2159), you get a whole lot: two ovens, five burners, and a boatload of features. But after looking at the performance test results, we found that the KitchenAid KGRS505XSS may not be such great value after all, especially in comparison to some of the other ovens we've tested.

We expect better performance than this. Tweet It

On the plus side, you've got the rolling rack, the oval griddle burner, the extra oven, the string of convection settings, the speedy broiler, and the quick preheating time. Many of these features and normal oven functions work well, or well enough, but it's hard to ignore problems with both the rangetop and the oven. The convection oven's lack of temperature control and the underpowered rangetop might be tolerable in a unit half the price, but for 2,000 dollars, we expect better performance than this.

This oven clearly stresses features over performance, which is silly, because many of those features are dependent on solid performance. Save your money and look elsewhere.

Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.
Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.
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Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.
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