ovens
  • Best of Year 2013
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KitchenAid KGRS308BSS Review

The KGRS308BSS impressed us with great test results and a slew of features.

Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.

Introduction

If you're willing to spend $1,799 on an appliance, which is what this KitchenAid costs, you're probably in the market for top-tier performance, lots of features, and an elegant look. After all, a user simply looking for something "good enough" can easily settle for a unit that costs hundreds of dollars less.

While we can't objectively tell you whether the stainless steel KGRS308BSS will meet your needs, we can tell you that it is a fantastic performer, ready for whatever culinary task you throw at it, onto it, or into it. The exceptional gas rangetop performed quite well, acing our boiling test, and down below, the oven kept temperatures close to the target for even cooking.

With features including a convection mode, a griddle, and an "AquaLift" self-cleaning method, it's hard to go wrong.

Design & Usability

Stainless is the eye-candy of today's kitchen, and this KitchenAid has plenty of it.

The KitchenAid Architect Series II KGRS308BSS is a traditional single oven gas range with a fifth burner added in the center. The stainless steel finish approximately follows the same design language of some of the other KitchenAid ranges we've seen. This good-looking oven hosts a keep-warm drawer below, and sharp, industrial continuous grates along the rangetop. But don't take our word for it—head over to the photo gallery and run your own aesthetics test.

The large 5.8 cubic foot oven cavity is certainly large enough to accommodate the Thanksgiving turkey and whatever else you throw into it. Three, arrangeable racks divide the oven: one rack is max capacity, one is split, and one is a "SatinGlide" roll-out extension rack. Of course, a large convection fan sits at the back, circulating the hot air to cook items more quickly and efficiently.

This oven uses a water-based system called "AquaLift" that cleans at lower temperatures. Tweet It

The cleaning method is different from the normal pyrolitic way. Instead of simply heating up for an extended period, this oven uses a water-based system called "AquaLeft" that cleans at lower temperatures. This method is much quicker, something that messy users will definitely appreciate. Under an hour at 250°F is certainly more desirable than hours at 550°F.

Rangetop

We found excellent boiling and gas precision from this spirited range.

The gas rangetop sprinted to boil in our tests, although it didn't demonstrate a very wide range of temperatures for searing and simmering. This is the classic tradeoff with gas vs. electric. Though the temperature range proved narrow, the KGRS308BSS has the superior precision and responsiveness that make restaurant chefs choose gas almost every time.

The gas rangetop sprinted to boil in our tests. Tweet It

In addition to the four fantastic gas burners on the rangetop, a fifth 8,000 BTU burner lies in the center for more options. KitchenAid conveniently provides a griddle plate for the center burner when you buy a KGRS308BSS, a nice change from all the "sold separately" speak.

Oven Broiler & Convection

A baker couldn't ask for more.

This model's ability to maintain the proper temperature impressed us very much. Moreover, this oven treats user input as an order, not a suggestion, so temperatures are delightfully consistent. Even temperatures mean even cooking, so this is something that bakers should definitely think about when considering this appliance.

This oven treats user input as an order, not a suggestion, so temperatures are delightfully consistent. Tweet It

The oven didn't tarry to 350°F, taking just under 11 minutes. The convection fan didn't quite perform as spectacularly as the conventional mode did, but with the bar set so high, it was a long shot anyway. And for those who care less about the quality of the service and more about the speed: the oven didn't tarry to 350°F, taking just under 11 minutes to heat the 5.8 cubic foot cavity.

The broiler, the frequent underbelly of residential ranges, played that role again in the KitchenAid KGRS308BSS. Floundering weakly with the potency of an O'Douls non-alcoholic beer, it failed our tests.

Conclusion

This is a spectacular range.

For around $1,650 (MSRP $1,799), the KitchenAid Architect Series II KGRS308BSS is a fairly expensive oven, so we expected performance as high as the stack of money it takes to buy it. Through vigorous testing, this model performed very well compared to the field, and lived up to its price tag, as well.

The rangetop boiling abilities were phenomenal, with all three non-simmer burners able to boil six cups of water in under 10 minutes, and one of them in just five minutes. With the extra center burner and the griddle feature, the rangetop balances high performance with features—a mix to satisfy any chef. Often we see electric outperform gas, but not this time; these top-tier results, combined with a gas range's ease-of-use, constitute a winning package. The only disadvantage we saw was the rangetop's marginal simmering ability, so small quantities of liquid may require close attention.

While the oven didn't heat up that quickly, taking more than 10 minutes to reach 350°F, it performed splendidly once it got there, showing great accuracy as well as minimal temperature fluctuation. These two things ensure that food isn't overcooked or burnt on the outside and raw on the inside. Bakers and roasters will appreciate this very much. Unfortunately, the broiler didn't function well and timed out on our test, so it might be best to grill elsewhere.

The bottom line here is whether you need all these features and performance perks badly enough to foot the bill for this luxury item. If you need it and you can afford it, this would be a phenomenal machine to own.

Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.
Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.
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Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.
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